A long day of hiking has your body begging for a great night's rest. You can see it, you're so close, it's almost time to get into that sleeping bag.

The rooms along the trekking routes are not heated so it can be bitterly cold at night. 

 Typical teahouse accommodation with complimentary blankets and pillow. Put your sleeping bag on top of the mattress. Pile on the blankets for extra warmth 🔥

Typical teahouse accommodation with complimentary blankets and pillow. Put your sleeping bag on top of the mattress. Pile on the blankets for extra warmth 🔥

Here's some tips to stay comfy and toasty:

1. Sleeping bag ratings: A sleeping bag comfort rating is based on a person wearing thermals. For trekking in Nepal from October to December, a four-season sleeping bag with a comfort rating (not extreme) of 0 degrees may be sufficient. If you feel the cold, you can sleep in your down jacket. If you tend to run cold naturally, we recommend a higher rated sleeping bag.

A sleeping bag liner is highly recommended as you will be quite dirty after days of trekking. They're a must for hygiene in rented sleeping bags. 

2. Teahouse goodies: The teahouses you are staying in are likely to have blankets and/or pillows but don't bank on them. Bring a liner or something to put on top of the pillows - the pillows there have seen many hikers' heads. If you cannot sleep without a good pillow, bring an inflatable pillow. To save space, you can stuff your carrier bag with soft clothes to make a great pillow. It is always good to sleep with your head elevated - it helps prevent cerebral oedema at high altitudes.

3. Luxuries: Walls are thin plywood and not insulated, making earplugs a wise choice. The high altitude and the cold drains batteries very quickly. Place all your electronics and batteries in your sleeping bag with you to keep them warm and conserve battery. I recommend putting them in a ziplock bag so you don't need to play hide-and-seek with them in the morning. There's nothing worse than waking up with a battery in your sock or a plug jamming into your spine. 

4. Makeshift electric blanket: Imagine if you could get the feeling of an electric blanket on the freezing mountains.... well you can!

  1. Fill a Nalgene with hot water.
  2. Roll hot Nalgene around the inside of the bag for a few minutes to warm up all corners
  3. Toss said Nalgene (wrapped in a sock or fleece) in as a hot water bottle.
  4. Step in and be embraced by the hug of a warm sleeping bag. P.S. make sure the bottle lid is tight - down feathers+water = ruined sleeping bag and clothes for the whole trip. 

Stay snug as a bug!